Getting to Know Wolfe Creek Preserve: Stump Tower

While perusing our blog, you may have noticed that we have a series of posts entitled “Getting to Know Wolfe Creek Preserve”. The history of this land means a lot to us, which is why we’re taking the time to share the story of each landmark on the zipline course with you. In addition to protecting and preserving the land through conservation efforts and our forest management plan, we love sharing the significance of this place with visitors on a daily basis by guiding them through our zipline  canopy tours, which feature the historical story of the land at each of the towers.

Before we share the story of one of the towers today, we’d like to take a minute to fill you in on who exactly the Wolfe family is and why they are so important to us. In the early 1830’s, a man named Isaac Wolfe was born in Austria. An adventurer and dreamer from birth, Isaac followed his heart to California where he participated in the gold rush and made a small fortune. After travelling and prospecting for a few years, he decided to settle on the beautiful piece of property that you can experience for yourself when you visit Wolfe Creek Preserve. Once settled on the land, he and his wife Sarah had a son named Eli who loved the land as much as his father did.

Today, we’re focusing on one of our zipline towers called “Stump,” a tower that honors Eli’s favorite horse. When you visit Wolfe Creek Preserve, you’ll probably be inclined to wander out onto one of our many observation towers to gaze at the mountain where our zipline course is situated. While looking at the towers, you might notice that one of them is shorter than the other. “Stump,” the shortest tower along the course, was named in honor of Eli’s brave companion, a shorter-than-average horse who accompanied him on many adventures.

One such adventure involved an enormous brown bear. While out on a long ride with Stump out East, Eli heard someone screaming. He spurred Stump toward the cries and came upon a terrifying scene; an Amish Buggy was being attacked by a huge bear. Although Eli loved nature and animals with all of his heart, he quickly sprang to action and killed the brown bear in order to save the Amish family. He was overcome with sadness at the loss of such a beautiful creature and never shared how he killed the bear. Even though he was sad about the bear, him and Stump were celebrated by the Amish family for saving their lives and began a lifelong friendship, beginning with treating them to a huge feast back at their farm. Each time Eli and Stump were traveling out East they would stop in and visit their Amish friends. Each time he would leave their farm they would load him up with canned goods for his journey. Eli began trading the canned goods and soon began distributing them all across the country.

In fact, you can purchase your own selection of Amish Feast, the authentic Amish made goods, while visiting our gift shop, Wolfe Creek Station. If you look closely at the label you will see the scene Eli first saw that day he rescued the Amish family. While at Wolfe Creek Station you can also have your picture taken with the huge bear who Eli saved the family from. So, even though Stump was short in stature, he made up for it with his bravery and dependability. Eli loved Stump very much and they had many exciting adventures together. We invite you to Wolfe Creek Preserve to experience the excitement of zipping into Stump tower and hearing the story first hand, having your picture taken with the huge brown bear Eli saved the family from, and tasting the wonderfully delicious authentic Amish canned goods.

 

This entry was posted in Construction Updates, Wolfe Creek Preserve and tagged , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

One Response to Getting to Know Wolfe Creek Preserve: Stump Tower

  1. Pam says:

    What a cute story!!

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